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Attention Educators and students! Upcoming student storytelling showcases!

Are you currently teaching storytelling, personal narrative, or first person non-fiction to your students? Or are you interested in developing a writing and storytelling unit? Do you have a project that might benefit from a storytelling element? Here are a few upcoming opportunities from our current education projects to see some excellent model texts and performances in action. Bring your students, or your colleagues! These shows are all ages, FREE, and open to all. (Special note: as these are high school and college students, there may be adult language and potentially triggering situations)

In chronological order!

Southwestern College VAMP: Are You Gonna Eat That

Thursday, November 16th at 7 PM
Field House Auditorium at Southwestern College
900 Otay Lakes Rd, Chula Vista, CA 91910
(part in Lot J student spaces)

Southwestern students drafted narratives on the theme of “Are You Gonna Eat That?” and just seven were selected to undergo an intensive editorial, critique, and coaching process. Food is an incredible storytelling prompt, and we love the many directions these students took the theme. Come hear their incredible stories!

More details


City College VAMP: Holler if Ya Hear Me

Wednesday, November 29 at 7 PM
Saville Theatre at City College
14th St & C St., San Diego, CA 92101

Do you understand the words coming out of my mouth? Have you ever struggled to be understood? We all want to be heard. But to be really understood–to have someone feel where you’re coming from–is powerful. Come hear our latest showcase of powerful student stories from City College!

More details.


HIGH TECH HIGH CHULA VISTA
The Power Within Storytelling Project

Nov-Dec, Project Reo Collective
2335 Reo Dr No. 6, San Diego, CA 92139

Thursday Nov. 30
Friday Dec. 1
Tuesday Dec. 5
Wednesday Dec. 6
Thursday Dec. 7

Five nights of fantastic storytelling from two classes of brilliant and inspiring high school juniors. These classes have incorporated biology into their examination of their own narratives, working hard all semester with our teaching artists, model texts from previous students, and with their peers. Join us for our third year working on this project with High Tech High Chula Vista.

More details TBD.


If you’d like to talk to us about opportunities with So Say We All teaching artists in your schools or institutions, please contact us.


To help So Say We All develop and sustain future education projects and more, please consider becoming a supporting member for as little as $5 per month.

VAMP: Teeth is this Thursday night!

Our October VAMP showcase is this Thursday night! The theme is TEETH.

(Teeth?!)

We eat with them, which is a good thing, so doesn’t that mean teeth should be good things? But when our bones are on the outside of our bodies, they can be the stuff of nightmares. Biting, fangs, dentists, drills, pliers, root canals, fetishes, supernumeraries… it’s all real life body horror. And we’re not the only creatures who have teeth.

We’ll spare you all the bite/chew on/grind/digest/brush up on puns. J/K. Take a sharp and minty bite out of this toothsome line-up!

Featuring:
Elaine Gingery
Ellen Wright
Julia Dixon Evans
Kevin Manly
Louise Julig
Milo Schapiro
Ryan Hicks

Produced by Jen Stiff and Ryan Bradford


VAMP: Teeth!
Thursday, October 26th
8:30 PM
Whistle Stop Bar
2236 Fern St
San Diego, CA 92104
(619) 284-6784
$5 suggested donation
www.sosayweallonline.com


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here: http://www.sosayweallonline.com/membership/

Incoming at the Without Walls Festival

Friday, October 20 at 7 PM
Saturday, October 21th at 7 PM
Sunday, October 22nd at 7 PM

Border X Brewing
2181 Logan Ave, San Diego, CA 92113

$10  ||   LEARN MORE  ||  BUY TICKETS

La Jolla Playhouse’s Without Walls (WOW) is four days of immersive and eclectic theatre for adventurous art lovers, thrill seekers and families. Now in its third outing, the festival lands in downtown San Diego this October!

Join So Say We All and the WOW Fest as we feature performers from Incoming: Sex, Drugs, and Copenhagen, our forthcoming collection of veteran nonfiction writing. Our veteran storytellers take the stage at Border X Brewing in Barrio Logan, October 20, 21, and 22.

True uncensored stories from the lives of America’s military, told in their own words, about the private and sometimes illicit escapes sought out by service members during their service and the time that follows as they readjust to the civilian world. Hilarious, surprising and honest to the core, and featuring a different cast every night, this newest offering by So Say We All will defy any notions you have about our service members.

THREE performances:

Friday, October 20 at 7 PM
featuring: Adam Stone, Allison Gill, Francisco Martinezcuello, Jim Ruland, Kurt Kalbfleisch, Michelle Kerouac, and Tenley Lozano

Saturday, October 21th at 7 PM
featuring: Adam Stone, Derrick Woodford, Francisco Martinezcuello, James Seddon, Kurt Kalbfleisch, Michelle Kerouac, and Tenley Lozano

Sunday, October 22nd at 7 PM
featuring: Adam Stone, Allison Gill, Derrick Woodford, Francisco Martinezcuello, Jim Ruland, Michelle Kerouac, and Tenley Lozano

Border X Brewing
2181 Logan Ave, San Diego, CA 92113

$10  ||   LEARN MORE  ||  BUY TICKETS

All group sales can be booked by phone or by email at groupsales@ljp.org — 10% OFF, $3 per order fee

Strong language, adult content. General admission. Limited seating; first come, first served. Standing may be required. Wheelchair accessible. Recommended for ages 18+. Cash is not accepted for ticket payment onsite.

Please contact LJPH Patron Services if you require any special assistance.


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider becoming a sustaining member for as little as $5 per month.

Amelia Gray reads at The Foundry on 9/9

The Foundry is our literary reading and education series, bringing a host of new voices, both emerging and well acclaimed, to our fair city. Our upcoming Foundry reading, on Saturday September 9th, features Skyler McCurine, Nicholas Bredie, Jac Jemc, and today’s spotlight, Amelia Gray.

The first real literary reading I remember attending was the esteemed Vermin on the Mount, four or five years ago. Amelia Gray read, and I’d never heard of her before. To people in the literary world that’s sort of ridiculous. And to anyone who has experienced Amelia at a reading, she is a force of nature. Inspired and a little awestruck, I bucked up some new writer courage and approached her afterwards, telling her she did great. I asked her if she had any work I could find online, and she (with her three-going-on-four books at the time) smiled, so nicely, and said, “Sure, yes I do.”

Amelia’s writing is always transformative: her characters, their worlds, and their objects often turn your understanding on end. And Isadora, Amelia Gray’s brand new novel (just out this summer from FSG), while unlike anything I’ve read from her before, maintains this, gorgeously so. Isadora delves into the life of the American dancer Isadora Duncan. It’s tragic, and weird, and darkly funny. She unsettles her readers, charms and endears them, makes them laugh, and then sort of pulls the rug out a little bit.

From an NPR review of Isadora:

Gray is a gutsy, utterly original writer, and this is the finest work she’s done so far. Isadora is a masterful portrait of one of America’s greatest artists, and it’s also a beautiful reflection on what it means to be suffocated by grief, but not quite willing to give up: “In order to understand the greatest joys of life, you must do more than open yourself to its greatest sorrows. You must invite it to join you in your home and beguile it to stay.”

Read the rest of the review at NPR.

If you don’t have a copy of Isadora yet, you can read a brand new Amelia Gray short flash fiction story, “The Hostage,” published this summer at The New Yorker.

“You’re not putting a dye pack in there, are you?” he asked.

The woman turned to look at him, and he was surprised to see that his question seemed to have wounded her. “I would never,” she said. “What would make you say that?”

“I’m sorry.” He tried to think about what would make him say it; he had seen a dye pack in a movie once and knew that it could explode and make a terrible mess. There was a lot that he didn’t know about robbing banks, and every moment was another opportunity to reveal his ignorance.

Read the rest at The New Yorker.

AMELIA GRAY is the author of five books, most recently Isadora (FSG). Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the NYPL Young Lion, of FC2’s Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction. She lives in Los Angeles.


We can’t wait for you to meet Amelia Gray and hear her read at The Foundry, this Saturday September 9th at The Rose in South Park (2219 30th Street). Amelia reads alongside Jac Jemc, Nicholas Bredie, and Skyler McCurine.

Doors at 7:00 PM
Readings start at 7:30 PM!

And join us for The Foundry’s associated master class, “Fooling Ourselves (Into Writing),” taught by Jac Jemc that afternoon from 2-4 PM. There are just a few spots left!


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider becoming a sustaining member for as little as $5 per month. Details here.


Julia Dixon Evans

Skyler McCurine reads at The Foundry on 9/9

The Foundry is our literary reading and education series, bringing a host of new voices, both emerging and well acclaimed, to our fair city. Our upcoming reading, on Saturday September 9th, features Amelia Gray, Jac Jemc, Emma Smith-Stevens, Nicholas Bredie, and today’s spotlight, Skyler McCurine.

Skyler’s essay, “Black. Woman.,” which debuted on our VAMP stage in 2016, is featured in the brand new issue of The Radvocate Fifteen, our literary journal. Skyler’s writing richly touches on selflessness and the ways we struggle to understand our ourselves, our families, and the (sometimes awful) people around us.

Every time we went to the Beauty Supply store, to re-up on my natural hair care products, I whined over the Just For Me Box, a relaxer designed for young girls. I thought, “if only I too could have a side pony tail, Surely Zack Morris would fall in love with me then.” My mother fought me daily, a battle of which I am grateful for. She fought to keep me black, she made me grapple with myself until I saw my features for what they are, beautiful. I learned to not shy away from environments in which I was different and come my sophomore year of high school, she found another opportunity for me to harness my TOKEN power. She became drawn to the whitest sport in the world, threading our love of water within it: rowing.

from The Radvocate Fifteen.

Skyler is one of our hardest working and inspirational coaches and producers for VAMP and our education outreach projects. We can’t wait to feature her work on a new stage, and can’t wait for you to meet her at The Rose on Saturday the 9th! Skyler will read alongside Amelia Gray, Jac Jemc, Emma Smith-Stevens, and Nicholas Bredie. The Rose is located at 2219 30th Street in South Park. Doors: 7, Show: 7:30. 21+. 


 Skyler McCurine is redefining the look of leadership as a personal stylist, public speaker, wonder woman and founder of Le Red Balloon.  Driven by the lackluster stereotypical portrayal of women in the media, she leads workshops for teenage girls and professional women around conscious media consumption, leadership, self­ acceptance, personal branding, and of course, style. Skyler’s passion for fostering leadership, audacity, selflessness, gratitude and courage in young women led her to invitation to TEDx, SD Business Journal “Emerging Generation Award” and her recent invitation to attend the Forbes Under 30 Summit as Swiss Luxury watch brand’ Baume & Mercier’s guest of distinction.  She was a finalist for the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 list in the social entrepreneurship category. She is a native San Diegan and received her BA in Communication Studies from Loyola Marymount University and MA in Organizational Management from Ashford University.  Her fervent belief in inclusion, red balloons, and champagne are her personal North Stars.

Skyler as Saint Sugar Hill by Alanna Airitam


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider becoming a sustaining member for as little as $5 per month.

Jac Jemc reads (and teaches!) in San Diego on 9/9

The Foundry is our literary reading and education series, bringing a host of new voices, both emerging and well acclaimed, to our fair city. Our upcoming reading, on Saturday September 9th, features Amelia Gray, Skyler McCurine, Emma Smith-Stevens, Nicholas Bredie, and today’s spotlight, Jac Jemc.

Jac, in addition to reading, will also teach a master class for us while she is in town. To register for “Fooling Ourselves (Into Writing),” 9/9 from 2-4 PM, click here. Don’t miss it.

So Say We All was lucky enough to publish Jac Jemc in Black Candies: See Through in 2013, So Say We All’s journal of literary horror. You can read her story, “Angles,” here, which is actually an excerpt of her newest novel, The Grip of ItHer writing is gorgeous and terrifying, gets under your skin quickly, and stays there.

Maybe I find a body and it’s hard as diamonds or maybe I find the body and it’s just a pile of soft bones and teeth or maybe it’s a body whose nails have screamed themselves free of absent fingers. What will a rat eat first?

Or maybe there’s no body and I just dream that there’s an answer to the low moaning we hear, and the stains that grow and shrink on our walls and bodies, and the secrets we uncover behind secrets.

Read more of “Angles,” an excerpt from The Grip of It, here.

Her book was just released to an impressive critical response earlier this August. You can read this fantastic review of The Grip of It at Electric Literature:

Jemc is telling us the story of the putrefaction of a relationship. This relationship is not clean-cut and bookended by dramatic flares — it festers, untended, a thriving hotbed for the things that break us down, cell by cell. It doesn’t choke, but lines the airway slowly, turning a once-healthy breath into the ragged pull from a plastic straw. “Bad behavior heralds ruin,” says Julie, when she is utterly convinced that the haunting must be her fault: she is unwilling to accept that malevolence exists for its own sake, but convinced it must be part of a puritanical order of punishment.

Read the full review here.

One of the things we love about Jac is how supportive she is in the literary world. Jac publishes a fascinating list of her literary rejections, which you can read (and obsess over) here.  Lifting the veil on the dark side of publishing makes us all feel a little less alone.

Here she is in conversation with Amber Sparks for The Fanzine.

I don’t usually know my characters before I write a book. I do the old “put-them-in-situations-and-see-how-they-react” test of their mettle. I might even venture to say I know them even less at the end of the book because of what you mention about how I’m sort of always living in that gap of what we think we know about another person but don’t. But that’s probably what makes a character seem more real and human, right? To have them do surprising, unexpected things that surprise both the other characters and the reader.

Read the full conversation here.

We hope you’ll come meet Jac, and take her class, when she’s in town! Jac Jemc reads alongside Amelia Gray, Emma Smith-Stevens, Nicholas Bredie, and Skyler McCurine at The Foundry Reading Series on Saturday, September 9th at 7 PM at The Rose in South Park.

Jac Jemc is the author of The Grip of It (FSG Originals). Her first novel, My Only Wife (Dzanc Books) was a finalist for the 2013 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction and winner of the Paula Anderson Book Award, and her collection of stories, A Different Bed Every Time (Dzanc Books) was named one of Amazon’s best story collections of 2014. She edits nonfiction for Hobart.

If you like what we do at So Say We All, a literary nonprofit and small press dedicated to helping people tell their stories, please consider becoming a sustaining member.

Nicholas Bredie reads at The Foundry on 9/9!

The Foundry is our literary reading series, featuring writers near and far, both established and emerging, fiction, nonfiction, poetry, anything. Our next reading is Saturday, September 9th at The Rose in South Park. Join us for readings by Amelia Gray, Jac Jemc, Emma Smith-Stevens, Skyler McCurine, and today’s feature, Nicholas Bredie.

Nicholas Bredie is the author of the novel Not Constantinople, from Dzanc Books, Summer 2017. With Joanna Howard, he is the translator of Frédéric Boyer’s novella Cows, published by Noemi Press. His writing has appeared in The Believer, The Los Angeles Review of Books, The Fairy Tale Review, LitHub, Puerto del Sol, Electric Literature and elsewhere. After living and working in Istanbul, Turkey, he is now in Los Angeles with his wife, Nora Lange.

You can read this excerpt from his novel, Not Constantinople, up at Literary Hub.

Not Constantinople is a rich, witty book that is equally as character-driven as it is place-driven as it is plot-driven.

Virginia’s hand found the neck of the Jack Daniel’s protruding from one of the sacks. Wielding the square bottle like a mace, she demanded that the strangers remove themselves. She was like the one animatron in a wax museum, sloshing the liquor in small but sincere strokes while everyone else froze.

“Isn’t that, like, an eighty-dollar bottle?” the man said, unperturbed. “Are you sure you want to waste it on me?”

Read the rest of the excerpt here.

Here is a delightful Electric Literature interview with Nick by Maureen Moore, a friend who had briefly lived with Nick and his wife, Nora, while they lived in Turkey. The idea of an “ex-pat novel” is rife with preconceived ideas and expectations, and perhaps even derision from a reader, and Nick manages to throw these expectations out of the window. While reading Not Constantinople, this excerpt often came to mind:

MM: Something that contributed to that unsettling feeling was seeing everything about the city written in its American English equivalent. I think I found that to be rare, finding these foreign names of places and things in English. Even one of Turkey’s most famous writers is referred to as Mr. Cotton. I’d love to hear it a little bit about this choice.

NB: I think it is connected to the idea of undermining or disenchanting. Having the names in plain English takes some of the exoticism out of them. There are some linguistic jokes in there too. For example Mr. Cotton’s neighborhood, Orhan Pamuk’s neighborhood, is Nişantaşı. He takes some care explaining the origin of that name in Istanbul, his memoir. It translates as “target stone,” because that was where the Ottomans set up their targets to practice archery and shooting. But Nişantaşı is also the Turkish word for “starch,” and it’s a kind of tony neighborhood, so I translated it as ‘The Starch.’

MM: For the reader, I also felt it further marked Fred and Virginia’s foreignness, as if they didn’t want to call those places by their Turkish names. It further separated them from the expected experience of the place.

NB: When we moved abroad, my uncle who was a foreign correspondent for a number of years said that the most important thing you can do is abandon analogy. To not try and compare, and make your experience fit some preconceived notions. How the characters behave and how they diverge ultimately in the book has to do with how they deal with their expectations of life abroad. In real life it is a situation of extremes: there is no family and no old friends and little language and a host of received notions about the place.

Read the full interview here.

We hope you’ll come join Nick at The Rose wine bar in South Park on Saturday, September 9th for The Foundry reading series. Nick will read alongside Jac Jemc, Amelia Gray, Skyler McCurine, and Emma Smith-Stevens. Stay tuned to learn more about the other readers as we approach the show!


We will also host a master class that afternoon, taught by Jac Jemc, called “Fooling Ourselves (Into Writing).” Work with a fantastic writer for a super bargain price! Scholarships available! For details, or to register, visit here. Spend the entire afternoon with your Foundry readers!


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider becoming a sustaining member for as little as $5 per month. Details here.

Our next Foundry reading series is September 9th!

Featuring Amelia Gray, Jac Jemc, Emma Smith-Stevens, Nicholas Bredie, and Skyler McCurine!

The Foundry is our literary reading series, featuring writers near and far, both established and emerging, fiction, nonfiction, poetry, anything. Our next reading is Saturday, September 9th at The Rose in South Park. Join us for readings by Amelia Gray, Jac Jemc, Emma Smith-Stevens, Nicholas Bredie, and Skyler McCurine.

Jac Jemc will also teach an accompanying Master Class earlier that day, “Fooling Yourself Into Writing.” Details here.

THE FOUNDRY: A READING SERIES
SATURDAY, SEPT 9th
THE ROSE
Doors: 7:00 PM
Readings: 7:30 PM
$5 suggested donation

The Rose (21+) serves beer, wine, and food. Come for dinner! https://www.therosewinebar.com/menus

Here’s a little bit about our readers:

AMELIA GRAY is the author of five books, most recently Isadora (FSG). Her fiction and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Tin House, and VICE. She is winner of the NYPL Young Lion, of FC2’s Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize, and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction. She writes for television and lives in Los Angeles.

JAC JEMC is the author of THE GRIP OF IT forthcoming from FSG Originals, MY ONLY WIFE and A DIFFERENT BED EVERY TIME. She has been the recipient of two Illinois Arts Council Professional Development Grants, and was named as one of 25 Writers to Watch by the Guild Literary Complex and one of New City’s Lit 50 in Chicago. She teaches English and Creative Writing and currently serves as a web nonfiction editor for Hobart.

EMMA SMITH-STEVENS is the author of a novel, THE AUSTRALIAN (Dzanc Books), and a short story collection, GREYHOUNDS (Dzanc Books), forthcoming in early 2018. She currently serves as fiction editor of The Mondegreen and lives in New York.

SKYLER McCURINE is a personal stylist, public speaker, VAMP producer, writer, and founder of Le Red Balloon. She has performed with TEDx, and received an SD Business Journal “Emerging Generation Award” and a recent invitation to attend the Forbes Under 30 Summit as Swiss Luxury watch brand’ Baume & Mercier’s guest of distinction. She was a finalist for the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 list in the social entrepreneurship category. She is a native San Diegan.

NICHOLAS BREDIE is the author of the novel NOT CONSTANTINOPLE, forthcoming from Dzanc Books, Spring 2017. With Joanna Howard, he is the co-translator of Frédéric Boyer’s novella COWS, published by Noemi Press, Summer 2014. His writing has appeared in The Believer, The Brooklyn Rail, The Fairy Tale Review, Opium, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere. He is a doctoral fellow in the Creative Writing and Literature Program at USC.


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider becoming a supporting member for as little as $5 per month:www.sosayweallonline.com/membership

So Say We All at Millennial Pink on Friday 8/18!

General: $8 / Members: $5
Event admission includes access to Millennial Pink exhibition.

So Say We All presents an evening of storytelling at San Diego Art Institute on Friday, August 18th as part of the Millennial Pink exhibit. Join us for stories of identity, queerness, sex, and reclamation: true personal narratives from San Diegans. All ages, though some stories contain mature language and themes.

So Say We All at Millennial Pink at SDAI

Millennial Pink is an exhibition dedicated to the evolution of queer aesthetics, with an emphasis on imagery that is both intrinsically beautiful, natural, fluid, and celebratory. As the millennial generation readily embraces the concept of non-binary gender identity and sexual fluidity, the aesthetic tropes of gendered colors, materials, and processes in art are slowly being dismantled and/or reclaimed as gender-neutral practices.

Performers include:

Yvonne Schmeltz is queer and a lot of other things including but not limited to fat, fluid, and living. Yvonne was hatched in the small state of Indiana in the United States. After 22 years of being surrounded by cornfields, cemeteries, and schizophrenics; they moved to San Diego, California. Yvonne has been writing ever since she can remember. Published in CityWorks, the San Diego City College Literary Journal, past performer of So Say We All, and currently working on an M.A. in English at UC Irvine, Yvonne is interested in writing as a way to mental health and social justice.

Joe Fejeran:Born and raised on the island of Guam, Joe Fejeran is a writer/podcaster living in San Diego. Themes that interest him are sexuality, visibility, representation, and identity. You can subscribe to his podcasts, the Untitled Friendship Project and FRIGHT SCHOOL, on iTunes or SoundCloud.

 

Frank DiPalermo: “I am queer. First I accepted that fact. Then I embraced it. Then I fell in love with it. Everything I’ve ever written or ever will write is a celebration of my queer self in some way.”

 

 

Hunter Gatewood is a proud Obecian who writes essays and short stories and nearly-done novels. His writing group informed him recently that all his work is about identity and place. His favorite things include drink tickets, cliffs both geographic and existential, and passion fruit from his neighbor’s vine. If that last thing sounds dirty, it’s not. He is finally getting out more to see live music.

Sage Foley came to San Diego from her native Boston by way of the US Navy where she served five years as a surgical tech. She is pursuing her BA in creative writing at SDSU, misses the woods, and will probably sleep with your girlfriend.

 

Adrian Downing-Espinal is an alcohol and drug counselor by day, and queer activist, well all the time. Adrian is involved with various movements in San Diego and especially interested in bringing visibility and voice to queer women’s issues and youth, and practicing solidarity with others. Adrian is originally from New York but a San Diegan by choice and a “Future Lesbian of America” by destiny.

Tickets available at the door and include access to the entire exhibit. For more ticket information, visit San Diego Art Institute’s website: http://www.sandiego-art.org/upcoming/sswa-mp


 

 


So Say We All is a literary nonprofit based in San Diego committed to helping people tell their stories. For more details or to become a sustaining member, visit www.sosayweallonline.com/membership

“Fooling Ourselves (Into Writing)”: A So Say We All Master Class with Jac Jemc!

Announcing a new Foundry reading series Master Class! On September 9th, Jac Jemc will teach “Fooling Ourselves (Into Writing),” a two hour workshop and master class.

Feeling stumped or stagnant? Have an idea, but don’t know where to start? Not a “writing from ideas” kind of writer? In this workshop we’ll explore ways of tricking ourselves into writing. We’ll create language banks, dig up gluts of memory, and then hunt for the narrative hiding in these resources. We’ll also look at writers who have developed unique methods of generating work and mimic these efforts at spinning raw material into stories.
Saturday, September 9th
2:00 – 4:00 PM
Mission Hills United Methodist Church
4044 Lark St, San Diego, CA 92103
tuition:
$35 general
$30 members
scholarships available
SIGN UP NOW!
Two Scholarship Types Available
Scholarship application deadline: August 27th
(Scholarship notification: September 1st)
Jac Jemc is author of the brand new novel The Grip of It (FSG 2017), and will be reading with us that evening at 7 PM at The Foundry (at The Rose Wine Bar in South Park), alongside Amelia Gray, Skyler McCurine, Emma Smith-Stevens, and Nicholas Bredie. Jac lives in Chicago, and is also author of My Only Wife and A Different Bed Every Time. She has been the recipient of two Illinois Arts Council Professional Development Grants, and was named as one of 25 Writers to Watch by the Guild Literary Complex and one of New City’s Lit 50 in Chicago. She teaches English and Creative Writing and currently serves as a web nonfiction editor for Hobart.

If you like what we do at So Say We All, a literary nonprofit, please consider becoming a sustaining member for as little as $5 per month. Details here.