Category Archives: Media

The latest media from So Say We All.

Say hello to The Radvocate Fourteen

It’s here. Happy publication day to The Radvocate Fourteen!

Over the past five years, The Radvocate, our literary journal, has grown to be over a hundred pages in an issue, a real book, packed with striking fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and interviews. We’re proud of the work inside this issue, from both emerging and established writers.

And you can hold it in your hot little hands for just ten bucks.

Go get it. Go get rad: https://www.amazon.com/Radvocate-14-Matt-E-Lewis/dp/0988368692/

rad-14COVER-new-edits

The Radvocate Fourteen features work from: Karl Sherlock, Joe Baumann, John Vanderslice, Anthony Martin, Jamie Sullivan, Meggie Royer, Caroline Taylor, Emily Green, Scott Sherman, Laura Preble, Allyson Whipple, Sara Morrison, Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Janet Joyner, Eric Raymond, Lois Harrod, Dania Brett, Harley Lethalm // Cover Art: Matt Parchinski // Editor: Matt E. Lewis

And please join us for the San Diego launch for the Radvocate Fourteen, with readings from a few of the issue’s contributors and piles and piles of copies for sale. It’s Saturday, September 24th at 7:00 pm at The Glashaus.

radvocate 14 release

More about The Radvocate #14:


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here.

 

In The Radvocate 14: Laura Preble

The Radvocate Fourteen will be released tomorrow, Tuesday, September 6th! The Radvocate is our literary magazine, and we can’t wait to share this with you. Order your copy now so it’ll arrive just in time.

To give you a taste of the fantastic and striking fiction, poetry, and non-fiction in the book, here’s a little snippet from Laura Preble’s short story, “Headless Angels,” which appears in this issue:

We brush by red lights and hurricane windows, we are swept into the crowd. It’s a streetful of good times, no one comes here to brood, and if they do it, they get kicked out.

It feels good to walk after the train, especially with Jim, since I haven’t seen him for months. The sweet air and the music, it would all be perfect—coffee and beignets in the morning, staying up all night talking in a little boarding house on the Rue Royale, with a real gaslight winking out on the cobblestones below, then sleeping. He’d see, finally, what we are together, we’d hear a plaintive whisper of Louis Armstrong’s phantom trumpet—

“We got married.” He’s looking at the pavement, says it as if he just told me the time.

“What?”

“Karen and I. We got married.”

I look straight ahead into the backs of strangers, concentrate on the foreign perfume of people I will never see again or know at all.

Order your copy of The Radvocate Fourteen now, for more of Laura’s story, as well as many other fine pieces!

Laura Preble is the author of the popular Queen Geek Social Club YA series as well as the novel Out. She was an award-winning straff writer for the San Diego Union-Tribune and has contributed to the magazines NEA Today, California Educator, Westways, Writer’s Digest, and Hysteria. She has worked as a freelance content writer for Binary Labs (for Glencoe publishing), and has published five young adult fiction novels with Penguin publishing. She won a Kurt Vonnegut fiction prize.



radvocate 14 release

The Radvocate Fourteen features work from: Karl Sherlock, Joe Baumann, John Vanderslice, Anthony Martin, Jamie Sullivan, Meggie Royer, Caroline Taylor, Emily Green, Scott Sherman, Laura Preble, Allyson Whipple, Sara Morrison, Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Janet Joyner, Eric Raymond, Lois Harrod, Dania Brett, Harley Lethalm. // Cover Art: Matt Parchinski // Editor: Matt E. Lewis
rad-14COVERspine

If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here.

In The Radvocate 14: Anthony Martin

The Radvocate Fourteen hits the stores and your hearts this upcoming Tuesday, September 6th! The Radvocate is our literary magazine, and we can’t wait to share this with you. You can even order your copy now so it’ll arrive just in time.

To get you in the mood, and to tease you for our upcoming Launch Party & Reading at Glashaus on September 24th, here’s a little snippet from contributor Anthony Martin’s short story, “Harvey Stone,” in which the titualar Harvey toys with some poor, unsuspecting Mormon boys that come to his door:

Harvey slammed the bottle down and reached back into the seat of his wheelchair for his chrome-plated nine-millimeter Beretta. I knew it well. He pulled the sliding mechanism and chambered a round.

“Take the drink.”

The boys looked at each other. Ponytail was frightened. Black Curls braved it first, downing the whiskey in one go as if he’d done it before. He put the glass down firmly and glared at Harvey as he swallowed. He was angry now and Harvey knew it.

“That’s good,” he said and turned the Beretta toward Ponytail, who was staring at the caramel liquid in his glass. The boy took a deep breath and drank his share like a glass of water, slow and steady. His face soured at the foulness of it and he started to cough after bottoms-up. He dropped the glass to the carpet and grasped at his throat.

“Breathe,” said Harvey. “There. That’s good. It goes away, see. Burns good.” He rested the Beretta on his impotent knee, his finger still on the trigger. “Now, unless either of you wants another one for the road, get the god fearing Joseph Smith out of my living room.”

Anthony Martin’s work is published or forthcoming in The Tishman Review, Paper Darts, and Whiskey Island (among other fine places). Come hear Anthony read from “Harvey Stone,” along with Sara Morrison, Karl Sherlock, Dania Brett, and Ryan Hicks, on Saturday, September 24th at Glashaus.

radvocate 14 release


The Radvocate Fourteen features work from: Karl Sherlock, Joe Baumann, John Vanderslice, Anthony Martin, Jamie Sullivan, Meggie Royer, Caroline Taylor, Emily Green, Scott Sherman, Laura Preble, Allyson Whipple, Sara Morrison, Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Janet Joyner, Eric Raymond, Lois Harrod, Dania Brett, Harley Lethalm. // Cover Art: Matt Parchinski // Editor: Matt E. Lewis
rad-14COVERspine

If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here.

The Radvocate Fourteen: Coming Soon!

The Radvocate #14 is almost here. We’re pleased to announce the publication date of this fine literary magazine: September 6th. Stay tuned for teasers, where to buy your copy, and details on our upcoming release party and reading.

Featuring work from: Karl Sherlock, Joe Baumann, John Vanderslice, Anthony Martin, Jamie Sullivan, Meggie Royer, Caroline Taylor, Emily Green, Scott Sherman, Laura Preble, Allyson Whipple, Sara Morrison, Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Janet Joyner, Eric Raymond, Lois Harrod, Dania Brett, Harley Lethalm.

Cover Art: Matt Parchinski

Editor: Matt E. Lewis

Welcome to the fourteenth issue of The Radvocate. What started in 2011 as a poorly-xeroxed cry for artistic solidarity in the form of a zine, morphed into an open-sourced platform of expression. A like-minded community of artists was formed: poets, authors, artists, photographers, columnists, videographers, journalists, and many more joined together from all over the country to make the eclectic issues a reality. In those flimsy paper copies, the soul of The Radvocate was forged, an irreverent but proud spirit which carries on to this day.
We can’t wait for you to enjoy this literary magazine. It’s a great and mighty book.


rad-14COVERspine

If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here.


Incoming Reviewed at The Rumpus

So nice to see a great and thoughtful review of Incoming up at The Rumpus today!

It is a rare nonfiction collection about these wars, but there is another reason it is unique as well: its mission is not only to bridge the deep divide between the military and civilian public, but also to bridges the divides between the unique experiences of all who have served, “active duty and veterans alike, men and women, gay and straight, across the multitude of ethnicity.” In other words, it is not just a collection of war stories, but rather a book intended to show the diversity of experiences and perspectives for those involved in the wars.

The piece studied two collections of stories: one from a single author, Luke Mogelson’s These Heroic, Happy Dead along with our Incoming: Veteran Writers on Returning Home.

The literature of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan seems to be turning a similar corner. The initial push of largely excellent fiction about these wars from civilian and military writers alike is morphing into its second act, where much that was initially explored is now accepted as fact and provides the foundation for deeper exploration by other authors. The nonfiction of these wars, which has many more titles and many more years to contend with, is also moving away from the simple memoirs reporting on their places, battles, and people.

Incoming is available for purchase on Amazon, or at other venues, including all of our local shows. Have a read of some of these fantastic true narratives written by veterans.

Incoming is important. As an outgrowth of several writing programs and initiatives, it offers what appears to be unfiltered and unmediated voices from the wars. Because it is the result of several writing programs and initiatives, there is hope that the editors will produce more works like it in the future. At least we can hope that they do.

We hope so too. Read the full review here.

If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here.

Incoming cover

INCOMING: An Excerpt of Natalie Lovejoy’s “Two Roads”

Our anthology of true veteran literature, “Incoming: Veteran Writers on Coming Home” was published earlier this year. It’s a collection of real stories, written by veterans, in their own voices, on the theme of coming home. This is the book that launched a public radio show. Purchase copies on Amazon, tell your friends, tell your colleagues, tell your mom, tell your Goodreads friends. We hope you love it as much as we do.

Incoming cover

Contributor Natalie Lovejoy wrote an original musical, “Deployed,” while married to a soldier who was currently deployed in Iraq. But her story, “Two Roads” takes on what happens when somebody comes home.

One reader contacted us after reading Natalie’s piece, to say:

“…I’m sobbing and am having trouble stilling my breath to find my voice. I have never felt that anyone understood what it meant to be a military wife; and quite rightly so because no one in my immediate circle was. You have put all of those feelings into a few short pages. Thank you for writing. Thank you for understanding.”

–Jessica W

We were so glad to feature Natalie’s story, “Two Roads” in Incoming. Here’s a short excerpt:

The GPS says it’s only thirty-four miles until the beltway. We are sitting in one of our car-trip formations: His eyes locked forward, his back soldier-straight, his jaw tight, his right hand gripping the steering wheel instead of my hand. I sit cross-legged, with my body and eyes tilted toward the passenger window.

[…]

…I’d learned to keep my outbursts to myself — in fact, it was my patriotic duty to do so. Don’t tell him about your problems because it will upset him, and he needs to focus on the mission. It’s okay for you to be upset but nor for him to be. Because what he’s doing is important and what you’re doing is not. Because his life is important and yours is not. At least not as important as his. This is your role in life, and you  must accept it. You need to accept not mattering as much. But it’s really not so bad — you get a roof over your head, free dental cleanings, and tax-free shopping at the PX. Mattering is overrated. Calm down, woman, and treat yourself to a manicure.

Natalie’s piece is vulnerable, eye-opening, and brutally beautiful. Read the rest of her story, and many other stories on the theme of coming home, in a copy of Incoming. You can buy it from Amazon here.

Lovejoy Headshot(3)

Natalie Lovejoy is a composer, lyricist, and bookwriter whose work as been performed at Lincoln Center, 54 Below, the Flea Theater, and The Duplex, to name a few. Her original musical, Deployed, which she began writing while married to a soldier deployed to Iraq with the 101st Airborne Division, premiered off-off Broadway at the Abingdon Theatre Company in November 2013 and played again at the Gene Frankel Theatre in January 2014 to sold-out audiences. She is currently collaborating on three new musicals and is listed in the director of musical theater writers at contemporarymusicaltheatre.com. Her education includes NYU Steinhardt (MM in Music Composition), Catholic University (BM in Musical Theater), the BMI Lehman Engel Musical Theatre Workshop, and the Johnny Mercer Musical Theatre Project at Northwestern University. She is a Professional Member of ASCAP and The Dramatist Guild. www.natalielovejoy.nyc

We are an Independent Bookstore!

Happy Independent Bookstore Day! Did you know we have our own indie bookstore? In addition to selling books at our shows and events, we also sell our titles online in our new online bookstore.

So Say We All Press is a very small and independent publisher, and we hope you’ll consider buying some of our fantastic books, non-fiction, fiction, poetry, art, everything. We love sharing stories with you.

Visit the bookstore.
12888542_10100501388360791_8754099073623122719_o(buy our books please and thank you)

A glowing review of INCOMING from Red Bull Rising

INCOMING, our just-published collection of true veteran stories on the theme of coming home, was reviewed by Red Bull Rising.

RBR header 2012 new 950 pixel wide

Exploring themes of home, homecoming, and finding one’s place in the world, the anthology “Incoming” hits a sweet spot on the terrain of contemporary veteran-voiced literature, and is certain to expand and enrich future conversations between civilian and military populations.

The review gives a glowing account of the book’s composition: its themes, its significance, and the variety of contributors.

There is, in short, something for everyone in this book: the profane, the sublime, and the mundane.

Thank you, everyone at Red Bull Rising, for the thoughtful read and kind, insightful words. Go read the review here, and then pick up your own copy of INCOMING.

This is clear-eyed. This is heart-felt. This is the real deal.

Incoming cover

INCOMING: An excerpt of Benjamin Busch’s “Home Invasion”

Our anthology of true veteran literature, “Incoming: Veteran Writers on Coming Home” was published this week. We hope you love and are as transformed by it as we are. It’s a collection of real stories, written by veterans, in their own voices, on the theme of coming home. This is the book that launched a public radio show! Purchase copies on Amazon, tell your friends, tell your colleagues, tell your Goodreads friends.

BenBusch2

Contributor Benjamin Busch is an actor, writer, photographer, and filmmaker who spends considerable amounts of time looking at rocks in the wilds of his beloved Michigan with his wife and children. We are so proud to publish Ben’s story, “Home Invasion,” in Incoming. Here’s a little snippet:

In the spring of 2001 we were rehearsing for wars we no longer expected to happen. Everything we carried was green and we weren’t thinking of deserts yet. We stayed on our bases and made believe, attacking ourselves and then going home, over and over. We drove to drills from suburbs through the back roads of Virginia, paved colonial routes that wound through the countryside.[…]

[…] By the spring of 2005 I was in Ramadi, Iraq on my second combat tour. The city was made of concrete and metal, all the homes poured or built with hollow blocks. The floors could not rot, but they could be cracked and the city often shook with car bombs or IEDs, smoke rising out of neighborhoods full of children. Some homes had been collapsed by the war, all of the rooms crushed into a thin pile of fragments and rebar. Our enemies fought us from houses and apartments, holding families hostage or driving them out. They brought violence and we responded in kind, keeping the city frightened. Our patrols took sporadic fire and we fought house to house because there was no other choice. We were left to search homes we had searched many times before, the women and children gathered in one room waiting for us to leave, knowing that the men we sought were already gone. They lived in between all of us.

Benjamin Busch served 16 years as an infantry and light armored reconnaissance officer in the United States Marine Corps, deploying to Iraq in 2003 and again in 2005 where he was wounded in the battle for Ramadi. He is the author of a memoir, Dust to Dust, and has published in Harper’s, The New York Times Magazine, Prairie Schooner, Five Points and Michigan Quarterly Review among others. He has been a contributor to NPR’s All Things Considered and The Daily Beast. He lives on a farm in Michigan.

Read the rest of Ben’s story, as well as many others like it and many others wildly different from it, in our freshly minted anthology, INCOMING: Veteran Writers on Coming Home.

“What they have to say is often unbearable, sometimes hilarious, always compelling, and cinematic.” – Robin Young, NPR’s Here and Now.

“Miasma” by C.A. Schaefer now published online

Say hello to the new Black Candies website. Black Candies is our journal of literary horror and dark fiction, showcasing writing and art from both local and worldwide contributors.

As we approach the April 30th submission deadline for the women-identifying writers issue of Black Candies: “Gross and Unlikeable,” we are going to make select Black Candies stories available online.

To kick things off, take a look at C.A. Schaefer’s short story, “Miasma,” which was first published in Black Candies: See Through. You can learn more about See Through or purchase a copy in our book store here.

miasma-SSWA-WEB

Accompanying illustration by Carabella Sands

The little children call me The Beak Doctor, and squawk like birds around me. It is only play. But at my feet they throw flowers. They think it will keep them safe.

The beak is really a cone meant to hold clean scents: amber, camphor, myrrh.

Oh, I know how false miasma is. It is not bad air that carries the plague. I could laugh at the thought.

But they do not bring me to laugh. They bring to prod their clothes with my cane, to feel their pulse. They bring me to speak to the dying and the dead, to the children and wives and fathers.

(Read the rest here).

And while you’re there, poke around at the Black Candies website and learn more about submitting to the upcoming Gross and Unlikeable issue.