Tag Archives: live reading

Alex Zaragoza reads at The Foundry this Saturday!

The Foundry is our literary reading series, and we celebrate our 4th event this Saturday night, March 18th, at 7 PM, at Tiger Eye Hair in Golden Hill. We feature both emerging and established writers, novelists, short story writers, poets, memoirists, and journalists, like today’s feature, Alex Zaragoza.

Alex Zaragoza is a freelance writer covering arts, culture, food, the border, feminism and music in San Diego and Tijuana. She is a columnist at San Diego CityBeat, and Host+Writer/Producer of music/pop culture show ‘Unherd.’ She was raised on both sides of the border and works to share stories from the other side of the fence. 

As a columnist, journalist, and television host, we love Alex’s writing about feminism, race, the border, art and music, and relationships. She writes with a delicious mix of wisdom and irreverence, and can slip between in-depth, impressive journalistic coverage and hangover barf jokes from one piece to the next.

In a column for San Diego CityBeat, Alex examines her adolescent views of immigration, refuge, and humanity.

Fear of death has always been a major driver in my life. It’s like in one of my all-time favorite movies, Moonstruck, starring Cher and Nicolas Cage. Olympia Dukakis, who plays Cher’s mom in the movie and is a goddamn queen, asks, “Why do men chase women?” and when met with some bullshit answer from an older, skirt-chasing professor (played by John Mahoney, the dad from Frasier ), she answers, “I think it’s because they fear death.”

Death, as the movie explains, is the reason people (the movie pinpoints men, but I think this goes for all people regardless of gender) relentlessly pursue love and sex. But really, doesn’t that reasoning apply to anything? Why jump out of a plane? Why eat this whole pizza? Why go on a years-long cross-country trip? Why slip your number to that cutie at the grocery store? Why quit your corporate job to follow your dream of being a performance artist that smears shit on your face? Because I’m going to die someday so I must push myself to the limits of extreme experience so I don’t feel like I missed out on anything when the bell tolls for me.

Alex’s coverage of the US-Mexico border has also been featured by NPR, including this piece on food merchants at the border crossing:

Just about any time of day, there’s no going hungry in the border line. In the morning, warm burritos and tortas beckon. Afternoons bring street foods like bacon-wrapped hot dogs and tacos, tostilocos (Tostitos Salsa Verde corn chips covered with toppings including lime juice, hot sauce, Japanese peanuts and pickled pork rinds), and fruit salads smothered in lime, the Mexican spice mix Tajin, and a savory, fruit-based chamoy sauce. For the sweet tooth, there are desserts like the handmade, sorbet-like nieve de garrafa.

Feeding people is a deeply ingrained part of Mexican culture, and many of these vendors will tell stories of how they learned to cook (usually at home with their mother) and why they love making food (because food is love).

Her writing is evocative, enriching, and notably not here to make you comfortable. At The Foundry, Alex will read a little bit from some non-fiction that will be featured in O Magazine. (OMG OPRAH). Don’t miss it! Saturday, March 18th, at 7 PM at Tiger Eye Hair. She’ll read alongside Jami Attenberg, Kiik A.K., Wendy C. Ortiz, and Karolina Waclawiak.

The Foundry #4
Saturday, March 18th, 7 PM
Tiger Eye Hair
811 25th St, San Diego, CA 92102
all ages // $5 suggested donation

Here’s Drake enjoying Alex’s company


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Cali Linfor reads at The Foundry on 1/14

The Foundry is our literary reading series, and as we kick off its second year this Saturday, 1/14 at Public Square Coffee in La Mesa, we’d love to introduce you to the readers.

This Saturday’s reading features Meredith Alling, Leah Thomas, Henry Hoke, Justin Maurer, and Cali Linfor.

Cali Linfor teaches at SDSU, where she lectures in rhetoric, composition and writing. She served for sixteen years as poetry editor of Epicenter Literary Magazine; she has published poems, articles, and short stories in The Beloit Poetry Review, Manzanita Review, Ekphrasis, and others. Linfor was born with a genetic disability that has influenced her examinations of beauty and ugliness, and her encounters with reading and writing as a child were affected by dyslexia. Her first book, A Book of Ugly Things, appears in Lantern Tree: Four Books of Poems.

The first time I read Cali’s work was years ago, in a friend’s kitchen. We were making dinner together, and she put A Book of Ugly Things in my hands and pointed to a poem, “My Lover Runs His Fingers over Me.” I no longer have a copy of the book but I vividly remember the line: “Cut/where the scar still laps into air / and bone… Don’t be afraid. Enter me. Here.”

Cali’s poetry is unnerving, intimate, and unexpected. Sometimes horrific, always gorgeous. From her latest publication, “The Dark Question”:

When you dream
the dream of babies,
does each limb slumber
in its place? Every breath
is holy?

Five fingers and five toes. Even the dream catcher
has five strings crossing each other in the light.
The sparrow’s beak just so, the raindrop
perfect, and the open mouth of the flea.

The dark question, birth,
what right have I
to bear children
who surely could not be
in the image of God?

[…]

Read the rest of the poem here, at WordGathering.

We hope you’ll join us at The Foundry #3 to listen to Cali read some of her brand new work.

The Foundry #3 features Cali along with Meredith Alling, Leah Thomas, Henry Hoke, and Justin Maurer. Saturday, January 14th at 8 PM at Public Square Coffee House in La Mesa.

Julia Dixon Evans


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider becoming a supporting member for as little as $5 per month, or making a one-time contribution to our winter fundraiser here.

Leah Thomas reads at The Foundry on Jan 14th!

The Foundry is our literary reading series, now in its sophomore year. With the Foundry, we aim to bring both emerging and established voices in literature to our stage, from San Diego as well as showcasing touring authors.

Our first Foundry of 2017, The Foundry No. 3, is Saturday, January 14th at 8 PM at the beautiful new Public Square Coffee House in La Mesa. Grab coffee, a little snack, maybe a glass of wine, and relax with some fiery hot stories.

To get you all excited, as we approach the show, we’ll feature each of the writers. Up first? Leah Thomas. Leah is a VAMP contributor here in San Diego, and she charmed us on the stage at The Whistle Stop with her storytelling.

Leah’s debut novel, Because You’ll Never Meet Me (Bloomsbury, 2015), unravels the story of an unlikely friendship between two whip-smart kids with isolating circumstances. It’s a young adult novel, and we’re excited because Leah will be the first YA reader in The Foundry. The novel won a series of accolades and nominations, including being a Carnegie Award Nominee and a William C. Morris YA Debut Award Finalist.

From Because You’ll Never Meet Me:

Dear Fellow Hermit,

My name is Oliver, but most people who meet me end up calling me Ollie. I guess you don’t really have to, though, because odds are you’ll never meet me.

I can never travel to wherever you are, because a big part of what makes me a hermit is the fact that I’m deathly allergic to electricity. This is kind of massively incapacitating, but hey–everyone has problems, right?

-Ollie

Oliver:

Firstly, my father has confirmed that your penmanship is atrocious. At least you can spell.

Secondly, you are correct. We will not be meeting. This has little to do with your deafening personality. I am electric. Exposure to me would floor you.

-Moritz.

Ollie and Moritz’s friendship unfolds over letters exchanged, and we watch the boys also exchange hope, accusations, guilt, fear, dreams, sadness, and trust. It’s a funny, compelling read with a heart-wrenching edge to it: disability and isolation, bullying and the other, all flow steadily above the surface.

Leah’s follow-up to Because You’ll Never Meet MeNowhere Near You hits the shelves in February.

We can’t wait for you to hear Leah read at the Foundry Reading Series on Saturday, January 14th. Join us at Public Square Coffee House in the La Mesa Village at 8:00 PM. Details, RSVP, and invite your people: https://www.facebook.com/events/190542514741682/


If you like what we do at So Say We All, a literary arts non-profit and small press, please consider becoming a sustaining member here, or donating to our winter fundraiser here. Thank you, so much. Let’s hear the stories we need to hear in 2017.

Black Candies: Gross and Unlikeable Launch and Reading

Join us as we celebrate the release of our ALL WOMEN anthology of literary horror and dark fiction, as well as original art, Black Candies: Gross and Unlikeable.

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Gross and unlikeable is reality. Steaming viscera. Menstruation as omen. The sharp blade of a returned violence. The stories in this collection aren’t evoking a theme, but destroying the lie of women tamed, of women just so.

Come hear some of the stories from the collection and feast your eyes upon some deliciously dark artwork. Women. Horror. Gross. Unlikeable. YES.

Readings by:
Kayla Miller
Christina Lydia
Hanna Tawater
Jennifer D. Corley
…and more

Order here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0997949902 (we will also have books for sale at the show)
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32868943-black-candies

For more about Black Candies, visit the new Black Candies website.

Black Candies: Gross and Unlikeable Release Party
Thursday, December 8th at 8 PM
Whistle Stop Bar
2236 Fern St, San Diego, CA
$5 suggested donation

RSVP and invite your friends: https://www.facebook.com/events/1138153422920005/

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If you like what we do at So Say We All and would like us to keep doing it, please consider giving to our winter fundraising campaign or becoming a supporting member: www.sosayweallonline.com/membership

In The Radvocate 14: Karl Sherlock

The freshly-pressed newest issue of The Radvocate is filled to the brim with really great poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, and we can’t wait for you to read it. Order your copy now!

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If you’ll be in San Diego this Saturday, September 24th, come buy it directly from our Launch Party and Reading at The Glashaus, and we will also regale you with performances from the book. The reading will feature Radvocate contributors Anthony Martin, Dania Brett, Ryan Hicks, Sara Morrison, and Karl Sherlock, who we feature today.

Karl’s poem, “Pointless Drama: A Poem in Five Acts,” is strange, compelling, and sprawling. Here’s an excerpt:

Act I: Rising Action

[to be heralded in rumblings and preparatory ramblings in a deep off-stage voice–ideally Morgan Freeman or Colleen Dewhurst]

Drop
a nineteen forty-
something U.S. penny
from a skyscraper at
midnight and all at once
it’s a point in search of
conclusion, earth-bound, seventy-
some stories high becoming lower,
and the “low” of lower nearing
a point of zero acceleration, when
the gravity of the one story that remains
remains a story yet to be plumbed–
an upward zephyr in a downward yaw
over turvy then top; brake lights below
look up, threading a z-axis
on a grid of tarmac, and it’s all
a solid universe of the now
parked cars busting into stars, until
points are swallowing their outsides
in, birthing an infinite number of zeros
hobnailed on the cumbrous streets, while
windows whiplash into the doppler-
shifting slipstreams, wheat stalks
emancipated form a droplet of copper
smelted from sky, a russet exhale
that knocked its quantum of worth
right out of Abraham.

For more, come listen to Karl read his work at The Glashaus this Saturday, 9/24, at 7 PM. Or buy your copy now from Amazon!

Karl Sherlock is a Poetry Writing instructor and the Co-Coordinator of the Creative Writing Program at Grossmont College, in San Diego. He holds an MFA in Writing from the University of California, Irvine, and is a Fulbright alumnus and Academy of American Poets Prize recipient. His poems have appeared in Cream City ReviewDickinson Review, South Coast Poetry Journal, Alsop Review, gay writers journals such as The James White Review and Assaracus, and others. His prose memoirs have appeared in anthologies, including So Say We All’s The Far East, and in journals like Limehawk, for which he was a finalist for Sundress Publication’s 2014 “Best of the Net.”

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An ample list of goodies and treats about The Radvocate #14:

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If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here.

Jim Ruland Reads at The Foundry No. 2: An Interview

The Foundry is our shiny new literary reading series, launched beautifully this spring. Our second installment is this month, July 30th, at the delightful Tiger Eye Hair in Golden Hill. As we approach the show, we’d like you to get to know the readers a little bit, and today we land on one of our heroes, Jim Ruland. Jim will be joined by many other greats: Aaron BurchJean Guerrero, Juliet Escoria, Uzodinma Okehi, and Scott McClanahan.

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We love Jim’s writing. It’s intimate and obscure at the same time, delivering the fringe in oddly palatable and approachable ways. One of our favorite pieces is Cat Party, published this spring at Shadowgraph Quarterly.

So Say We All’s production director (and Foundry host) Julia Dixon Evans had a little chat with Jim recently.

jim only RulandTinWhistle Jim Ruland: pretty talented his entire life

JULIA DIXON EVANS: Jim! Thanks so much for agreeing to read at The Foundry, and for all your support in general. You’ve been a friend and volunteer of So Say We All far longer than I’ve been around. Tell me how you got involved?

JIM RULAND: I went to San Diego Animal Control and saw Justin Hudnall huddled in the corner. The rest is history.

JULIA: You’ve collaborated on some phenomenal co-writing projects lately: Giving The Finger, and My Damage. Co-writing seems like an incredibly daunting undertaking, mostly because I imagine you and your cowriter sitting together in someone’s dining room, typing and reading out loud together. I’m sure that’s not the case, but were both of those projects similar in how the work and the writing got done? That is, did you spend a lot of time on-location, getting your hands dirty? And is it still as lonely as typical writing can feel?

JIM: No, it’s not lonely at all, because you constantly have your subject in your ear. The backbone of the book comes from recorded interviews so the first step is getting the subject’s voice down. I’ve been writing for punk rock zines and interviewing bands for most of my adult life. Collaborating feels like an extension of that. I think that’s why so many journalists get into these kinds of projects. It’s a combination of access and know-how.

With Keith Morris, we spent a lot of time together because he is 100% committed to the project. We went to his old haunts in Hermosa Beach, Hollywood and Chinatown. He read each draft with laserlike editorial focus. We ate a lot of tacos and drank a lot of coffee together. To be honest, I’m going to be sad when it’s all over.

JULIA: What would be a dream co-writing assignment for you right now?

JIM: Raymond Pettibon. Not that he needs a collaborator. Raymond did the artwork for My Damage and my name is right there on the cover so I don’t think the universe is taking any more of my requests. 

JULIA: Back to loneliness. (Of course). In your novel Forest of Fortune, which is excellent, you follow the arc of three characters: Pemberton, Alice, and Lupita. And every single one of them seems so lonely. Even in the 24/7 world of a casino or a city after dark, you write very desolate characters. But they each have a confidant, a companion, and sometimes that does very little for their loneliness. In a bigger picture, isn’t that part of the appeal of a thing like gambling, of a thing like a bar: together, alone/alone, together? 

JIM: Casinos are very lonely places. People don’t strike up conversations with each other the way bar patrons do. It would be very hard to sit in a bar for three hours and not talk to anyone. In a casino? No problem. Although card games like blackjack and poker are very social, there’s nothing social about a slot machine.

JULIA: I loved your TNB Self-Interview. It’s equal parts depressing and encouraging. Your journey from starting out to publication truly took 20 years? And at what point in that was Forest of Fortune born? How did you keep at this? I understand that there’s some novelty to this interview, but the interviewee gives off a sense of true inevitability. Inevitable writing in the face of inevitable failure. That’s amazing.

JIM: Thank you. It did indeed take me 20 years to publish a novel, but I had many other successes and setbacks along the way (I won an NEA, published a short story collection, got fired by my agent, drank waaaaaay too much, etc.). Forest of Fortune was born after I’d completed my third novel and my agent invited me to explore other opportunities. I’d been working at an Indian casino for two and a half years and decided to finally write about it. I knocked out a draft in 2008 and in early 2009 I lost a friend to a drug overdose. That was a very potent reminder that our time here is finite. After I got sober and put my house in order, so to speak, I went back to work on the book. I’ve been turning and burning ever since.

JULIA: You and I recently discussed your [unpublished] collection of short stories [note: one of these stories appears in So Say We All’s dark ficton/horror anthology, Black Candies: See Through]. Tell me a little more about it. How is your short work — and this collection — different from your novel, Forest of Fortune

JIM: Cat Sitting in Hollywood is a linked collection of stories that draws on my adventures as an amateur cat sitter during the time I was commuting between San Diego and Los Angeles. After working in the casino for over five years, I was seeing LA through new eyes and writing these very odd stories. As much as it pains me to admit it, I owe a debt of gratitude to Ryan Bradford because his solicitations for Black Candies helped me see that these stories I was writing were all variations on the theme of cat sitting.

JULIA: Your reading series, Vermin on the Mount, is as vibrant as ever. I think one of the reasons I asked you to read at The Foundry is because I love hearing you read, but it seems the only chances I’ve had to see you read the last few years are in different cities, for AWP. Do you find that, as a sort of San Diego gatekeeper figure for other people’s work, helping get it out into the world, you are more inspired and empowered to create your own work? Or are there some consequences, like lower productivity, too much multi-tasking to write?

JIM: I wouldn’t say I’m a gatekeeper. Far from it. I think VAMP [So Say We All’s monthly curated literary storytelling showcase] does a far better job of showcasing San Diego’s literary talent. If anything, I play a small role in bringing writers from outside of San Diego to our city. Vermin on the Mount, which is about to celebrate its 12th anniversary, continues to inspire me. When that stops being true, I’ll stop doing it.

JULIA: I love that you always ask your Vermin readers this, and as a fledgling member of the well-t-shirted Legion of Vermin myself, I wonder if it’s all right for me to ask this of you: (to quote the great Jim Ruland) “What’s the most unusual experience you’ve ever had at a reading?”

JIM: A long time ago, a reader at Vermin on the Mount in Chinatown, through a combination of nerves, alcohol and white powder, was so wasted she could barely get through her reading. She thought every word that came out of her mouth was absolutely hysterical. At first I was horrified for the reader. Then I thought I was going to have to gong her off the stage. Finally, I just sat back and enjoyed the performance.

The strangest part was when the show was over she sat down next to me and asked me all kinds of questions about my family. The kind of conversation you have with a really thoughtful acquaintance. To this day I have no idea which part of her show was an act.

JULIA: And what are you working on next? What are you reading?

JIM: I’m working on a bunch of stuff, including a novel set in LA in the near future that I’ve been drafting in fits and starts since 2012 but is finally coming together, and a couple of collaborations that I can’t say too much about other than I’ve been reading nothing but commercial fiction this summer: thrillers, mysteries, spy stories and crime novels. I’m finally reading San Diego writer Don Winslow and wondering why I waited so long.

JULIA: Thanks so much, and we look forward to hearing you read on the 30th!

JIM: De nada!  


Come hear Jim read alongside Aaron Burch, Jean Guerrero, Juliet Escoria, Uzodinma Okehi, and Scott McClanahan at The Foundry, So Say We All’s new literary reading series. The Foundry #2 all goes down on Saturday, July 30th in Golden Hill.

The Foundry, No. 2
Saturday, July 30th at 7:00 p.m.
Tiger Eye Hair
(by the new Golden Hill Dark Horse Coffee)
811 25th Street, Suite 105 San Diego, CA 92102
(619) 798-3996
$5 (all ages)

Jim Ruland is the author of the award-winning novel Forest of Fortune and the short story collection Big Lonesome. He co-authored My Damage with Keith Morris, founding member of Black Flag, Circle Jerks and OFF!, which will be published by Da Capo on August 30, 2016. Jim is the books columnist for San Diego CityBeat and writes book reviews for the Los Angeles Times and the Los Angeles Review of Books. Jim’s work has appeared in numerous publications, including The BelieverEsquire,GrantaHobart and Oxford American, and he runs the Southern California-based reading series Vermin on the Mount, now in its twelfth year.


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here.

Aaron Burch Reads at The Foundry No. 2: An Interview

When we found out that Aaron Burch would be touring along the west coast in support of his forthcoming book, a “Bookmarked” memoir structured around Stephen King’s The Body and Stand By Me, we thought: dibs.

The Foundry is our shiny new literary reading series, launched beautifully this spring with fantastic readings from Adrian Van Young, Lizz Huerta, Ryan Bradford, and Lauren Becker. Our second installment is this month, July 30th, at a fantastic and curious venue: Tiger Eye Hair in Golden Hill. Aaron will be joined by many other greats: Jean Guerrero, Juliet Escoria, Jim Ruland, Uzodinma Okehi, and Scott McClanahan.

So Say We All’s production director (and Foundry host) Julia Dixon Evans had a chance to email back and forth with Aaron recently. We discuss memoir, Stand By Me, and “the most important things,” to name a few. Enjoy Aaron’s answers (we did).

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JULIA DIXON EVANS: I’ve seen Stand By Me countless times, though not in years, and I have never read The Body. I think, going into it, I felt unqualified as a reader for that reason, but that feeling vanished on the first page. I love the way the movie and the book have non-warring real estate in your memoir. They do not compete for superiority, and neither feels more literary, more intellectual than the other. Have you always felt that way? Or, did you have some sort of evolution? Did you once think: “I should like the book better than the movie, because I’m a professor or whatever,” and then finally one day come around to recognizing that both book and movie are great?

AARON BURCH: I like the way you put that. That they have non-warring real-estate, and I’m glad any feelings of being unqualified vanished.

A couple things: Bookmarked was pitched to me as kind of like a “33-1/3, but for books.” I’m familiar with the series, though more as concept; I haven’t actually read very many. I think I’ve read all of the Boss Fight Books series though, itself a kind of “like 33-1/3, but for video games.” That said, of the first 12 books in that series, I think I’ve only played two of the games. What I learned from reading them was that whether or not I’d played the game had a small impact on my reading experience, via the pleasure of the familiar, but it was pretty minimal. Whenever a book got bogged down in the details of the game, either I’d played the game and those details felt only like they were telling me something I already knew, or I hadn’t played the game and the details felt confusing and distancing.

That gets at the first half of your question, I hope. The idea of being familiar or degree of qualification. As far as book v. movie… I kind of get at this in the book, I think, but I really love both. I don’t think I ever had any thoughts that I should prefer one or the other. Like many (I think?) I saw the movie first, and came to the novella through that, and though I read the novella at some point growing up, unlike the movie, I never revisited and reread. Until I added it to a syllabus, without rereading it first, so if anything there was something of a sigh of relief when the story held up in the classroom and gave us enough to talk about. I just think each is really strong on its own merits, though part of what I love about each is how similar they are, so the pleasure in one is often echoed in what I love about the other.

JULIA: [Mutual friend] Ryan Bradford and I both joked that we felt like we’d gone through one of your classes as we read the book. (Well, technically, I’m 99% sure I wrote it in the margins and then he read my review copy, so I like to think that I subliminally gave him that idea). I felt like I not only understood The Body / Stand By Me on an academic level, but I felt like I understood writing. It made me want to write. As an academic, did your teaching change over the year you wrote this book? How will you tackle this story in the future?

AARON: I think maybe I won’t teach the book again, actually. Part of my approach to teaching is encouraging my students to try to figure something out. As I say in the book, to ask interesting questions, and then struggle for interesting answers. And I often find myself in the process of discovery right alongside them. I don’t think I “figured out” The Body while writing this book, but now that the book is written and done, it does feel like maybe I’d be a little less open to discovery, which feels like it would be a hinderance in the classroom.

I think my understanding of my teaching changed more than my actual teaching. Like, I don’t think I would have said the above paragraph in quite that way before working on this book.

JULIA: I was eager to hear about friendship in this book. I expected it. I think, though, in the end, that we didn’t so much learn about your “four,” just the fact that you’ve always had that as your touchstone. I think the book gives us your ideas of friendship rather than the grit and the intimacy of your actual friendships. Did you feel guarded about that? Or do you feel on some level, that the idea of friendships — and the availability of them — are maybe the biggest source of comfort in the friendship anyway? That is, the details aren’t the thing here?

AARON: Here’s a theory I came up with after reading through these questions, which means I haven’t really road-tested it yet or anything, so I’m not sure how it’s going to come across. I think it’ll start self-deprecating and turn into a humblebrag, and it also might be wrong, but here goes…

I think most books (all? all that are good?) are “failures” in two ways:

One being that, unless you have an incredible ego about your own writing and/or are unimaginative in ambition, they feel not quite as good as what you’d envisioned it to be. The second is a failure of expectation, not so much expectation of quality but that it isn’t quite about what you thought it would be. (That isn’t really a “failure,” but I’m calling it one for sake of theory.)

Both of these are because what’s on the page is just never quite what was in your mind. Ira Glass called that first way “The Gap“; it’s often at the heart of writer’s block, etc. Embracing that gap is kinda the only way you’ll ever finish anything. And then, embracing that second “failure,” is what makes most good writing good, I think. Letting something become what it wants to be, instead of what you think it should be, or want it to be, or had set out for it to be, or whatever.

Which is a long, kinda bullshitty way of saying: half the reason I chose The Body to write about was because I wanted to write about (male) friendship. Maybe I was too guarded to do so, or maybe I just didn’t have as much to say about friendship as I thought I did, but at some point the book ended up being about teaching and marriage and narrative–how and why we tell the stories that we do–and so I tried to embrace those ideas, even though they weren’t what I’d set out to do.

JULIA: So many of my questions for you are whether you knew something all along or developed the idea as you examined the story to write this book. Gordie says: “The most important things are the hardest things to say,” and I think every time that came up, I read it through my hands, cringing a little bit, hoping you wouldn’t apply it to marriage. But you did, because: of course. Because that’s the trouble, isn’t it? And I wonder: Did you know this all along? Every read of The Body, every watch of the movie, every class you taught this to, did you know that this is a profound concept for friendships, for parents, for life, but the most difficult and most worth-it relationship you’ll ever want to say the hard things for is a marriage? Or was that a connection you made in writing your book?

AARON: Totally while writing the book. Almost every idea in the book was developed while actually writing the book. That sentence isn’t in the movie, and it had actually never stuck out with me when reading and teaching the novella, until I started working on this book. I just kept coming back to it, and at some point was like, shit, I guess that is how and why this book is gonna become about marriage…

JULIA: I feel like this is the tricky part of what I want to ask you, because it’s always the tricky part of things I want to talk about, and this part of the book was both beautiful but horrifying in its resonance with me. The way you write candidly about your marriage — and I use the word candid in a non-lip-service sort of way: You not only speak openly and kinda shrug-y about the difficulties of marriage, but you seem like you actually just feel open and shrug-y about it. I got such a strong sense of waiting as I read this. I think of early re-watches I’ve done of Stand By Me, and how you know the action is mere minutes away, so why are they just sitting there doing nothing at the dump? Get on with it. But the waiting is magical in really quiet ways. I know that waiting out the dark parts of a marriage is anything but magical, but the truth is: every marriage has dark parts, and even though that’s a unifying thing, those dark parts are different for everyone. And the end product of this in your book is that we are left with a suspended state. A marriage in flux, in suspension. And I wonder: as you finished the book, were you tempted to go back and either clue us in or clean it up? Show us what was resolved, the way Gordie does at the end of the movie and the book?

AARON: I think “open and shrug-y” is actually probably a pretty apt way of describing me in general. I started to answer a lot of questions not actually asked here, but instead will just say, no, I wasn’t ever really tempted to give that aspect of the book more resolution. I’m not sure why not but the lack of resolution always felt right. My question, a little more, became trying to pull that off, to end the book while still leaving some aspects of it in flux.

JULIA: Shortly before I started reading your book, writer Wendy C. Ortiz tweeted this: “I like when I’m familiar with a writer’s spoken voice & I like it & then read their whole book hearing it narrated in their voice.” And I thought about this tweet often as I read. I heard this entire book in your voice, which made it amazing. It felt like a friend. And I think what is masterful about the book is that I think it would feel like this regardless — your style is very conversational, very informal, even while dropping some major concepts. You have a very untidy and approachable style. You write a lot about not writing much non-fiction, but I’m curious if you studied it before diving in. If this was a calculated move: writing in a spoken, casual style?

AARON: Thanks! That’s an incredibly kind sentiment. I wouldn’t say it was calculated but… purposeful, maybe?

I think all good writing probably has its own specific rhythms and timing, and I think my own writing is usually strongest when it feels most conversational. I’m not sure how I found or realized that, but I’ve done a good number of readings and tours over the years, often with really great readers, and I think if and when I hold my own it is via a more informal, casual tone. I think when it’s felt both most natural and strongest or best or whatever is maybe when it feels most like I’m just telling a story.

As far as study or calculation… I didn’t “study” any nonfiction for this book, but I at times teach my Intro English classes as a kind of creative nonfiction class, despite having never really written creative nonfiction, and I ended up finding my own teaching to be incredibly self-instructive, in a way that I hadn’t realized it ever would be at the time. My second piece of “study” was probably reading so many of the Boss Fight Books. Each book took its own tactic at being “about” the game it was about and the ones that affected me the most were the ones that most braided being about the game and about the author. It’s funny, I’ve glanced at those books’ Goodreads pages and everyone (of course) has totally different opinions–some people aren’t really fans of the books that go personal, some people most loved the books in the series that I just didn’t. I reminded myself of that while working on this. I’d have moments of, “Ugh, nobody cares about you,” or “Oh, no, what if people just want to read more about Stand By Me,” but I’d remind myself of my own tastes, I’d remind myself that I was trying to write the book that I myself would most want to read.

JULIA: Early in your book, you talk about the origin story of Hobart, the literary journal you founded 15 years ago. Hobart is possibly my top “go-to” in the literary world. It’s the thing I recommend to the most people, either readers or writers. Sure, you’re boundary-pushing in many ways, but it’s still a very literary and very respected thing. But it had such a simple start. It’s so earnest, in a way, that you just started a website with a cool name. That you didn’t even understand that you were making a literary magazine when you first made it. You just knew what you liked. In a way, it sounds similar to your writing process for Bookmarked: The Body: That you wanted to write the kind of book you’d read. What’s your favorite piece you’ve published in the last 15 years? Maybe asking for a favorite is unfair, but what’s the first piece that comes to mind when I asked that? The most Hobart-y?

And can you sort of track your own tastes by looking at the kind of work you’ve published over the years? I suppose that would be a really cool look at the changing lit scene of the last decade and a half.

AARON: Again, Julia: thanks. That’s a very kind way of putting it.

[Wife and partner] Elizabeth gives me shit sometimes, for not really having goals; or, more specifically, I think she gives me shit for being afraid to say I have goals, or afraid to name them specifically. Which is fair enough. I’m more ambitious than I typically want to admit, which I think comes back to the “shrug-y”ness we talked about, my general “aw shucks”-y attitude. But, mostly, I want to write things that I would be most stoked to read, as a reader; and with Hobart, I mostly want to put out a journal that I’d want to read, and I don’t really read many journals.

Anyway. Again, that wasn’t quite your question. Nothing jumps to mind as a favorite. The more I think about it, the more Mike Meginnis’s “Navigators” stands out, in part cause I really love that story, in part cause it was in Best American Short Stories, so it’s easy to point to the anthologized thing as something that stands out. Also, I wasn’t only stoked for Mike to be in BASS, or for Hobart, but I thought it was extra rad just to see a story about video games get so recognized. I think that speaks to Hobart: literary and quality, all that, but also fun, a little more goofy or pop culture-y, or just generally not taking ourselves that seriously.

Speaking of, Roxane Gay’s “North Country” was in that same issue and was also in that year’s BASS. And as much as I loved the story at the time, I’ve taught it a number of times since, and I love it more each time I get to discuss it with a classroom of students, which I guess brings us back to The Body.

JULIA: Thank you so much, Aaron. We look forward to having you in town! And, of course, hearing you read from The Body: Bookmarked at The Foundry reading series on July 30th. It’s gonna be a great night of readings and I can’t wait to pour you a drink!


Come hear Aaron read at The Foundry No. 2, our literary reading series, Saturday, July 30th at 7 PM at Tiger Eye Hair in Golden Hill. For more details and to invite your Stand By Me-loving friends: https://www.facebook.com/events/1762857903955708/


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Aaron Burch is the author of Stephen King’s The Body: Bookmarked, a memoir about the King novella and Stand By Me. He is also the author of the short story collection, Backswing, and is the Founding Editor of the literary journal Hobart. Read an excerpt of The Body: Bookmarked here.

high school id(Aaron, a couple of months ago)


If you like what we do at So Say We All, please consider supporting us and becoming a member. Details on our membership page here.


Animal lovers, unite. VAMP is June 30th!

Do you love animals? And do you love stories? We have the purrfect show for you. VAMP: Animal Control is Thursday, June 30th at 8:30 PM at the Whistle Stop Bar. Come hear some fine creative non-fiction stories about the animals in our performer’s lives. VAMP is So Say We All’s monthly curated storytelling showcase, and we tell you stories each month at The Whistle Stop Bar in South Park. Our writers are chosen from a competitive field of blind submissions, and put through a grueling editing and coaching process.

eber-cat[clockwise from top: grueling critique process, cat]

VAMP: Animal Control is a night of stories about critters. They’re our best friends and our most frightening nightmares. We share this planet with many creatures and even though they don’t know how to build skyscrapers or develop smartphone apps, animals still very much shape our reality in many (sometimes ridiculous) ways. Also, they can be such murderous beasts.

We’ll feature stories about cats, dogs, lab mice, bears, snakes, rats, lizards, gerbils, and… a few surprises. Come hear some tail tales (lol) about the non-humans in our life. The animal show is always a doozy.

Featuring:
Matthew Baldwin
Ryan Bradford
Emily Burke
Ryan Hicks
Eber Lambert
Jennifer Stiff
Amy Thornton
Anastasia Zadeik

Produced by Jen Stiff and Jason Eliaser

VAMP: Animal Control
Thursday, June 30th
8:30 PM
Whistle Stop Bar
2236 Fern St
San Diego, CA 92104
(619) 284-6784
$5 suggested donation
www.sosayweallonline.com

animal control-square2

The Foundry #2 is Saturday July 30th

Our second installment of The Foundry, So Say We All’s brand new literary reading series, is coming Saturday, July 30th.

foundry2

We are really, insanely excited about (a) this line-up (b) the rad scooped out Texaco garage that is Tiger Eye Hair in Golden Hill, and (c) you coming to see it all.

More details about our readers soon, but for now, here’s a quick teaser. You should ask us in person how much we love these writers, and we will likely get overly excited and gush and hold you by the shoulders and read our favorite lines of their writing and you might be a bit embarrassed for us. But until then here’s some formal bios:

Aaron Burch is the author Stephen King’s The Body: Bookmarked, a memoir about the King novella and Stand By Me. He is also the author of the short story collection, Backswing, and is the Founding Editor of the literary journal Hobart.

Juliet Escoria is the author of the short story collection Black Cloud, which was originally published in 2014 by Civil Coping Mechanisms. In 2015, Emily Books published the ebook, Maro Verlag published a German translation, and Los Libros de la Mujer Rota published a Spanish translation. Witch Hunt, a collection of poems, was published by Lazy Fascist Press in May 2016. Escoria received a BA in Creative Writing from UC Riverside, and an MFA in Fiction Writing from Brooklyn College. Her writing can be found in places like VICE, The Fader, Dazed, Hobart, and more. She was born in Australia, raised in San Diego, and currently lives in West Virginia.

Jean Guerrero is the 2016 recipient of the PEN/FUSION Emerging Writers award for her manuscript Crux, a cross-border memoir about her quest to understand her Mexican father, whom she grew up believing was schizophrenic. She is the Fronteras reporter at KPBS, San Diego’s NPR and PBS affiliate, where she covers immigration and other border issues. Previously, she was a correspondent in Mexico City for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires, trekking through mountains with coffee smugglers, opium poppy producers and maize farmers. More recently, she ventured into Tijuana’s sewers to expose the plight of deported migrants. She holds a master’s in creative nonfiction from Goucher College, as well as a University of Southern California bachelor’s in journalism and minor in neuroscience. She is half Mexican, half Puerto Rican.

Scott McClanahan wrote The Incantations of Daniel Johnston and The Sarah Book. He lives in West Virginia.

Uzodinma Okehi spent 2 years handing out zines on the subway. Wasn’t as fun as he thought. His work has appeared in PankHobartBartleby Snopes, also many, many places, no doubt, you’ve never heard of. He has an MFA in writing from New York University. He lives in Brooklyn. His son is 8 yrs old, smiles a lot, (too much?), and will absolutely, cross you over and drain a jumper in your face.

Jim Ruland is the author of the award-winning novel Forest of Fortune and the short story collection Big Lonesome. He co-authored My Damage with Keith Morris, founding member of Black Flag, Circle Jerks and OFF!, which will be published by Da Capo on August 30, 2016. Jim is the books columnist for San Diego CityBeat and writes book reviews for the Los Angeles Times and the Los Angeles Review of Books. Jim’s work has appeared in numerous publications, including The BelieverEsquireGrantaHobart and Oxford American, and he runs the Southern California-based reading series Vermin on the Mount, now in its twelfth year.

About the venue: TIGER EYE HAIR is a cut/color/barbering lounge situated in an architecturally preserved Texaco gas station in Golden Hill.

There will be food for sale, and maybe a little something to whet your thirst. Because these readers are gonna be fiery hot.

The Foundry #2: A Literary Reading Series
Saturday, July 30th
7:30 PM
Tiger Eye Hair
(behind the Golden Hill Dark Horse Coffee)
811 25th Street, Suite 105 San Diego, CA 92102
(619) 798-3996
http://www.sosayweallonline.com
$5 (all ages)

http://www.sosayweallonline.com/introducing-the-foundry-a-literary-reading-series/

Submission deadline 5/1 for VAMP: In Real Life

IRL: The internet changes everything. Or does it? Do our online lives matter less than our offline lives? Is there a difference anymore? And what about the times when real people do very unreal things, no internet required? Come join us for stories about real life, about the internet, and about the ways those places intersect or the way they don’t intersect at all. IRL TMI LOL.

Submission deadline: Sunday, May 1st
Submission guidelines: http://www.sosayweallonline.com/submissions/

VAMP Showcase: “In Real Life.”
Thursday, May 26th
8:30pm – 10:00pm
Whistle Stop Bar
2236 Fern St, San Diego, CA 92104
(619) 284-6784
$5 suggested donation
http://www.sosayweallonline.com/