Tag Archives: So Say We All

So Say We All’s Long Story Short at The Ink Spot!

We’re moving Long Story Short indoors! Starting September 2015, come tell your stories at The Ink Spot at San Diego Writers, Ink. Long Story Short is the third Saturday of the month at 7 PM.

Long Story Short is So Say We All’s improv storytelling show. Have you ever been to a VAMP and thought, “I might have a story”? Well, Long Story Short is the perfect place to try it out.

Five minute stories, told by you, with no notes. Anyone can take the stage. You can sign up right when you get there (or you can even sign up halfway through the show). It’s casual, supportive, and pretty fun.

Our first Long Story Short at The Ink Spot will be Saturday, September 19th at 7 PM. The theme is “Euphoric Recall.”

Hope to hear from you (yes you) at The Ink Spot!

We’re crowd-sourcing next year’s VAMP themes

Got a VAMP theme suggestion for 2016?  Send it our way. We want to hear from anyone! Our writers, our volunteers, our darling audience members, ignorant trolls, anyone. Enter as many themes as tickle your fancy in the text box.

VAMP is our monthly, curated storytelling showcase, with each month’s stories prompted by a specific theme. Need some inspiration? Here’s our list of 2015 themes.

Thank you for sharing your ideas. You make VAMP great and we can’t wait to see what we can do together in 2016.

So Say We All’s Executive Director on a watchlist (but not THAT watchlist)

We’re bursting with pride to see our Executive Director, Justin Hudnall, on San Diego Magazine’s “5 People To Watch This Month” list for September.

The brief profile also mentions our work with our new literary magazine, The Radvocate. Read more about The Radvocate here.

And since we mentioned watchlists, now’s a good time to remind you about Black Candies: Surveillance, our journal of literary horror. Read it and learn how to do a top-notch job of “watching” Justin this month.

11894604_10154262135656164_2233678066641710335_o(don’t look behind you Justin)

 

So Say We All featured in San Diego Magazine

So Say We All is featured in this month’s San Diego Magazine story,  “The Age of Podcasting.”

Justin Hudnall’s voice is smooth and calm as he introduces San Diego war veterans telling deeply personal stories of their figurative and literal homecomings in the podcast series Incoming. The stories were recorded on stage and in the studio, but they have the closeness and clarity of two friends engaged in a tough conversation.

An outgrowth of a veterans’ writing workshop by Hudnall’s So Say We All literacy and performing arts collective, the podcasts were repackaged for the modern masses by public broadcaster KPBS.

Check out the whole story, which covers the KPBS Explore project and other local podcasting ventures, and be sure to listen to So Say We All’s Incoming here.

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Incoming is a collection of non-fiction stories told by local veterans, in their own words. Created around the theme of coming home, the stories will feature veterans sharing their experiences on transitioning back to civilian life. Each story is performed by the author, and followed by an interview.

“It’s like the antidote to overstimulation. Someone talking directly into your ear? There’s nothing more intimate.”

-Justin Hudnall

 

VAMP Showcase: Red Flags

Join So Say We All this Thursday, August 27th at 8:30 pm for our August VAMP Showcase, featuring curated stories on the theme of “Red Flags.”

Red flags, red lights, red tape. These things are supposed to warn us but sometimes we don’t pay attention. Join us for an evening of stories about gut instincts, warning lights, and that one time we just.didn’t.listen.

Our blind submission process featured more brave and wonderful submissions than we’ve ever seen before. Here’s who got caught in the net this month:

Featuring VAMP first-timers:

  • Becca Karpinski, with an inspiring and, at times, difficult story of travel, risk-taking, and mothering
  • Michelle Franke, PEN USA’s Executive Director, regales us with a tale of class, privilege, period wear
  • Jean Guerrero, from the KPBS Fronteras Desk, with a heartbreaking tale about the past, family, and, naturally, about VHS
  • Rachel Peschman, another VAMP first-timer, with a story of two troubled people navigating a troubled love.

 

And storytellers who have been on our stage once before, or maybe a dozen times before:

  • Anastasia Zadeik, with a stunning story about loss, memory, and family
  • Long-time VAMP performer and producer Ed Farragut will tell a story about a particularly gnarly work environment
  • So Say We All’s co-founder Jake Arky rolls back into town with an unsettling story about someone he was crazy for
  • and Jennifer Stiff, who has graced our stage several times with her incredibly funny yet intimate stories, with a harrowing tale of preventive measures.

Our Red Flags showcase is produced by Whitney Roux and Matt Lewis.

VAMP Showcase: “Red Flags”
Thursday, August 27th
8:30pm – 10:00pm
Whistle Stop Bar
2236 Fern St, San Diego, CA 92104
(619) 284-6784
$5 suggested donation
http://www.sosayweallonline.com/

Long Story Short: Super Nerd

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We’re all nerds about something. Come to Long Story Short, our monthly improv storytelling show, and tell us all about that one time you geeked out in epic proportions. Just in time for those fresh-from-Comic-Con stories.

Five minute stories, told by you, no notes. Anyone can take the stage!

Saturday, July 18th
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Evolution Fast Food
2965 5th Ave, San Diego, CA 92103
(619) 284-6784
$5 suggested donation

Announcing The Radvocate!

So Say We All is pleased to announce that we are now publishing The Radvocate!

The Radvocate is a literary arts magazine committed to sharing the work of new writers, poets and artists. Since 2011, The Radvocate has created zines, live shows and other media to give a platform and a voice to creatives, both local and worldwide. Now, in conjunction with So Say We All, The Radvocate releases its thirteenth issue, but its first as a literary journal.

Through this collection of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, interviews and art, we are setting a new standard for ourselves. Even though this is issue thirteen, this is a new beginning, in which two forces join together to declare their intentions and plant a flag in this place, this medium, and this moment. Join us. Get rad.

Featuring literary work from: Allison Whittenberg, Brandon Marlon, Kiik A.K., Patrick Mayuyu, Grant Mason, Meg Tuite, Mason Green-Richards, Parker Tettleton, Zachary Scott Hamilton, Clay Norvell, Neil P. McDevitt, Alan Semrow, Robin Wyatt Dunn, Alex Bosworth, Ryan Hicks, Johnnie B. Baker, and an interview with Henry Rollins. Edited by Matt E. Lewis.

Purchase Issue 13 of The Radvocate here.

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Also available for purchase here.

COMING UP! Join us for a release party and reading on Saturday, July 25th at James Coffee Co.

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More:

For more information, back issues, and other content, visit The Radvocate at www.theradvocateisamagazine.com

“I Take You To Be No Other Than Yourself,” by Joel Castellaw

We get to enjoy a lot of serendipity in our jobs at So Say We All, but nothing quite so beautiful as what happened this week: at Thursday’s VAMP, the theme of which was, “Wedding Season,” we closed our show with the beautiful words of Joel Castellaw’s, “I Take You To Be No Other Than Yourself,” and then woke Friday morning  to the ruling by the Supreme Court finally legalizing, with finality, the rights of all people to wed.  We had to share the story with you as soon as possible, so here, in disembodied audio, we hope you enjoy Joel’s story as much as we did. It’s an honor to be able to do what we do. Here’s to love.

Cheers, – Justin Hudnall

VAMP: Wedding Season

Bridal party hook-ups, awkward bachelor parties, and that time drunk Uncle Steve gave a 20 minute toast, you name it. Wedding Season is upon us, and come join us for some relief from the tulle and string quartets as we regale you with our finest and cringe-worthiest stories of state-sanctioned romance.

VAMP Showcase: “Wedding Season”
Thursday, June 25th
8:30pm – 10:00pm
Whistle Stop Bar
2236 Fern St, San Diego, CA 92104
(619) 284-6784
$5 suggested donation
http://www.sosayweallonline.com

Black Candies Editor Ryan Bradford on Why Horror Matters

Our own Julia Evans recently got to interview Ryan Bradford, editor of Black Candies, our journal of literary horror. He also volunteers as So Say We All’s creative director, as well as a producer, performer, and writing coach for us. Black Candies: Surveillance was recently released (and is currently a Recommended Book at Powell’s Books!) and to celebrate, we are hosting a reading and release party this Saturday night, 6/27, at Low Gallery in Barrio Logan.

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So Say We All: Hi Ryan. Why horror?

Ryan Bradford: Oh man, busting out the big guns first.

Truthfully, I’ve spent so many hours trying to figure this out for myself. I suspect, ultimately, horror fandom is very personal, and there is often an underlying vulnerability to every obsession.

For me, I’ve dealt with anxiety most of my teenage and adult life. Even in benign social situations, I experience physiological effects: sweating, increased heart rate and clenched jaw. It wasn’t until recently that I was able to recognize these symptoms as anxiety, which, as a therapist told me, is a body’s reaction to fear. Or, basically, I was constantly experiencing fight-or-flight symptoms, despite the fact that I wasn’t being threatened. Reading horror or watching horror, on the other hand, provides this little nest where these symptoms feel normal. It feels like I can be myself, where my anxiety doesn’t feel misplaced.

But I’m also kind of a horror snob, or, at least, very particular about it. I think if you look at the majority of horror books or movies, you’ll see an overbearing grotesqueness. I wanted Black Candies to be an antidote to all the gaudy stuff I was reading and watching. It sounds pretentious every time I say it, but I’ve always wanted Black Candies to be intelligent horror—full of subtlety, wit and nuance. I couldn’t find a lot of online or physical print journals that were satisfying those needs, so I decided to make one.

SSWA: Do you remember what sorts of things you were reading/watching when you started Black Candies four years ago?

RB: I think I read Blake Butler’s Scorch Atlas, Joey Comeau’s One Bloody Thing After Another, and Nick Antosca’s Midnight Picnic in a row and those books were dark and gross without being indulgent or typical. They also had serious emotional stakes that weren’t used as plot devices—which is rare in horror and dark fiction. Those were huge inspirations to Black Candies.

SSWA: Your themes are always a bit unexpected. What grabbed you about “surveillance”? Why did you want to curate a surveillance-themed issue?

RB: Good horror has always been a tool for addressing social issues of the time. I mean, look at George Romero movies—you can pretty much trace the history of American unrest through the “of the Dead” series.

So, I think like everyone else, I was freaked out when the Snowden bomb dropped, but it was also a moment of instant revelation: “Surveillance. That’s going to be the theme of the next issue.” It’s a fear that we all share right now to some extent, and I wanted to create something that we could all connect to.

SSWA: Do you primarily find authors who identify as horror writers?

RB: Not really. I just want people who can be dark. In fact, I think some of the best stories come from people who aren’t necessarily horror writers, but are given permission to tap into their dark side. It’s exciting when writers scare themselves at what they’re capable of writing.

SSWA: We feature a lot of women writers in Black Candies. Is this intentional?

RB: Yes, it’s intentional. I’ve found that women are often underrepresented in horror, and wanted to create a platform where they could not only have a voice, but be as gross, dark and unlikeable as they want. I still think there’s an attitude, even among the liberal literati, that can’t abide a woman writing ugly stories.

SSWA: What will non-horror readers think of these stories? or… Is this book accessible for people who traditionally do not think of themselves as horror fans?

RB: As I said above, I think “Surveillance” is a universal anxiety right now. Even if you’re not a horror fan, these stories should strike a nerve in you.

SSWA: And what about serious horror fans?

RB: If you’re a serious horror fan and you don’t like these, well, come at me, bros.

SSWA: There’ll be a live reading from the book this weekend, at the book release party. How does a story transform for you when you hear it read out loud? 

RB: It’s great to see how a story transforms when an author reads their own work. As I mentioned above, some of these authors don’t usually write horror, and when they do, it can be an exhilarating/terrifying experience for them. When you push that further and have them read this ordinarily-taboo piece of writing aloud, it can become a spectacle of emotion. Does that sound sadistic? Maybe.

SSWA: What’s next for Black Candies?

RB: I’ve always wanted to have an online Black Candies, so that may happen in the near future. Also, Black Candies-flavored Doritos.

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Read about how Black Candies: Surveillance is a Recommended Book at Powell’s Books in Portland here!

Join us at Low Gallery, 1878 Main Street, at 7pm on Saturday, June 27th for our Black Candies: Surveillance Reading and Release Party!

Purchase Black Candies: Surveillance here.